Health

Urinary tract infections and treatment in children

Urinary tract infections and treatment in children

Urinary tract infections are the most common infections after upper respiratory tract infection in children. Except in the newborn period, it is seen more frequently in girls than boys.

Urinary tract infection may involve the kidney and cause pyelonephritis, as well as cystitis in the lower urinary tract. Urinary tract infection is diagnosed by bacterial growth in urine culture. Sometimes, when urine is not taken under proper conditions, bacterial growth may occur and does not always mean infection.

The most common causative agent in urinary tract infections is intestinal bacteria. The first (80%) bacteria are called E. coli. Other intestinal bacteria are also common.
Viral and fungal infections can also be seen. The presence of more than one bacteria in urine culture usually suggests colonization and contamination.

COMING TO SQUARE

The anatomical structure of girls (because the urethra is shorter causes urinary tract infections to occur more frequently.

PREPARATORY CAUSES

Anatomical problems and dysfunctions play a role in the formation of urinary tract infections. Urinary tract reflux and urinary stone are the predisposing factors.

Impaired hygiene in the genital area may lead to urinary tract infection. The pool may cause urinary tract infections, especially if the hygiene is not good. Urinary tract infection is more common in children with chronic constipation
(depending on urine pooling)

CLINICAL FINDINGS

It depends on the age of the child and the level and severity of the infection.
Symptoms such as high fever, jaundice, inability to gain weight, restlessness, convulsion may be seen in the newborn period.
The infants also have symptoms such as loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, pallor and restlessness.
In older children, symptoms are more directive. Fever, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, low back pain, frequent urination, frequent urination, burning while urinating, inability to urinate.

DIAGNOSIS

The diagnosis of urinary tract infections is made by a significant number of bacterial growths in urine culture from urine samples taken under appropriate conditions. It is very important to obtain a correct urine sample in order to make a correct diagnosis and to avoid unnecessary treatments.
In older children, the urethra is cleaned with soapy water and rinsed with plenty of water (or three front-to-back cleaning with three cleaning cloths).
In infants, sterile urine can be obtained either by attaching the bladder to the sterile cleaned area. If urine is not completely sterile, it may be necessary to cultivate with a small tube catheterization or needle aspiration over the pubis…

Urine culture may take 2-3 days to complete. A complete urine test prior to the conclusion of the urine culture also gives an idea of ​​infection. In complete urine analysis, microscopy, leukocyte, erythrocyte, as well as chemical reactions in nitrite, leukocyte esterase, such as substances are examined.

TREATMENT

Treatment is antibiotic therapy. Newborn, small infants or very sick children may need antibiotic treatment by dammar route or injection or antibiotics are given orally. The result of culture and antibiogram is determined whether the antibiotic is effective.
If the urinary tract infection is left untreated, it can result in kidney damage and kidney failure, high blood pressure.

THINGS TO DO FOR PROTECTION

Front-to-back cleaning, especially for girls, with special attention to hygiene of the area.
Pool hygiene and wet swimwear
Constipation prevention
In children with frequent urinary tract infections, factors such as reflux are ruled out and preventive treatment is required, if necessary.